White Papers

The use of imaging colorimeter systems and analytical software to assess display brightness and color uniformity, contrast, and to identify defects in displays is well established. A fundamental difference between imaging colorimetry and traditional machine vision is imaging colorimetry's accuracy in matching human visual perception for light and color uniformity. This white paper describes how imaging colorimetry can be used in a fully-automated testing system to identify and quantify defects in high-speed, high-volume production environments. Read More...

The use of imaging colorimeter systems and analytical software to assess display brightness and color uniformity, contrast, and to identify defects in displays is well established. A fundamental difference between imaging colorimetry and traditional machine vision is imaging colorimetry's accuracy in Read More...


Specially calibrated to replicate human spatial perception of brightness and color, imaging colorimeters and photometers are ideal in a broad range of measurement and inspection applications. With multiple options for CCDs, control electronics, filters, and lenses, these powerful tools can be tailored to meet a user’s specific needs. Selecting the right CCD-based imaging colorimeter requires understanding a few basic trade-offs in imaging colorimeter architecture. This guide will help you determine right configuration for your needs. Read More...

Specially calibrated to replicate human spatial perception of brightness and color, imaging colorimeters and photometers are ideal in a broad range of measurement and inspection applications. With multiple options for CCDs, control electronics, filters, and lenses, these powerful tools can be tailored to Read More...


Human vision and perception are the ultimate determinants of display quality, however human judgment is variable, making it difficult to define and apply quantitatively in research or production environments. Traditional methods for automated defect detection do not relate directly to human perception. Accurately correlating human perceptions of defects with the information that can be gathered using imaging colorimeters offers an opportunity for objective and repeatable detection and quantification of such defects. Read More...
Human vision and perception are the ultimate determinants of display quality, however human judgment is variable, making it difficult to define and apply quantitatively in research or production environments. Traditional methods for automated defect detection do not relate directly to human perception. Read More...

OLEDs (Organic Light-Emitting Diodes) are emerging as the next wave of technology in the flat-panel display market. This is exciting because OLED displays promise improved display appearance for both smartphones and large-format TVs at lower cost and power than other display technologies. As OLED manufacturers work to launch commercially viable OLED based products, high costs due to manufacturing yield issues have hindered widespread OLED technology adoption, most dramatically in large-format implementations, as they drive up end customer prices. This guide describes how to use imaging colorimeters to improve OLED display production testing efficiency and yields for optimal price/performance. Read More...
OLEDs (Organic Light-Emitting Diodes) are emerging as the next wave of technology in the flat-panel display market. This is exciting because OLED displays promise improved display appearance for both smartphones and large-format TVs at lower cost and power than other display technologies. As OLED Read More...

With the excitement surrounding the emergence of LED lighting and displays it is becoming increasingly important to be able to measure the performance of LEDs and LED-based systems in accurate and meaningful ways. This is even more important as LEDs are increasingly used as an alternative to more traditional technologies. The intended purpose of the measurement - to inform development, to characterize or evaluate finished products, for production quality control, or for in-use performance assessment - determines the photometric and colorimetric quantities that are important to measure. This guide offers insight for choosing the best measurement system for LED sources, luminaires, and displays in order to acquire the most accurate data for these purposes. Read More...

With the excitement surrounding the emergence of LED lighting and displays it is becoming increasingly important to be able to measure the performance of LEDs and LED-based systems in accurate and meaningful ways. This is even more important as LEDs are increasingly used as an alternative to more Read More...


For optical design and product qualification, the output color and luminance distributions of large light sources are needed to qualify and predict the performance of architectural, automotive, street, security, entertainment and other lighting systems. However, these distributions are difficult to measure because of both the size of the source and the large space required for the measurement. For these lighting systems, measuring in the far field often requires a substantial distance – three meters or more is common – so that setting up the measurements in a controlled laboratory environment can be difficult and expensive. This guide explains how to ensure the most efficient measurment process for large light sources for optical design and simulation. Read More...

For optical design and product qualification, the output color and luminance distributions of large light sources are needed to qualify and predict the performance of architectural, automotive, street, security, entertainment and other lighting systems. However, these distributions are difficult to Read More...